Skip to navigation – Site map

What do we need for a Second Republic? High Energy Democracy and a Triple Movement

Mary P. Murphy
p. 33-50

Abstracts

This article discusses the prospects of Ireland emerging from crisis renewed and reformed as a second republic. Evidence from opinion polls and surveys confirms Irish citizens value key republican principles of equality, rights and fair distribution; however, trust in politics, government and non-government organisations is low and the 2016 general election confirmed the absence of leadership to create political momentum around such values. The answer to the question of what is needed to generate a new politics or a high energy democracy lies in understanding how the crisis has impacted on values and attitudes towards key leadership institutions and how it has changed Irish political and civil society. Examining the relationship and linkages between the two allows some assessment of Irish political and civil society’s capacity for a values-led discourse that could promote a transformative-type change. We identify the absence of effective framing, a necessary prerequisite for effective linkage and mobilisation. What is required for new politics is an Irish triple movement which incorporates gender and social reproduction, as well as environmental and traditional distributional concerns about income equality and public services. Such framing offers potential to mobilise across a wide range of actors and create a livelier battleground in which the interests of a much wider section of the population can find expression, create new alliances, reshape power relations and, over time, create a second republic.

Top of page

Excerpt

Full text document will be published online on November 2018.

Outline

Introduction
Values and Narratives
Looking forward – mapping political society
Looking forward – mapping civil society
A new politics?

First lines

Introduction

Reflecting on the outcome of the 2011 Irish general election (GE), Peadar Kirby and I discussed the prospects of Ireland emerging from crisis renewed and reformed as a second republic. We mapped Irish political and civil society’s capacity for a values-led discourse that could promote a transformative type of change. Five years later, reflecting on the outcome of the 2016 Irish GE, this article revisits the challenge of achieving the type of fundamental political, economic and social renewal encapsulated in the idea of a “second republic”. It is clear that the 2011 “pencil revolution” and rejection of FF as the dominant political power actor did not transform the direction of the Irish republic, but it did signal “the beginning of the beginning”. It remains to be seen whether the 2016 GE represents a watershed in realigning politics away from civil war or tribal politics and t...

Top of page

References

Bibliographical reference

Mary P. Murphy, « What do we need for a Second Republic? High Energy Democracy and a Triple Movement », Études irlandaises, 41-2 | 2016, 33-50.

Electronic reference

Mary P. Murphy, « What do we need for a Second Republic? High Energy Democracy and a Triple Movement », Études irlandaises [Online], 41-2 | 2016, Online since 30 November 2018, connection on 29 March 2017. URL : http://etudesirlandaises.revues.org/4969 ; DOI : 10.4000/etudesirlandaises.4969

Top of page

About the author

Mary P. Murphy

Maynooth University

Top of page

Copyright

© Presses universitaires de Rennes

Top of page